Other Aspects of Cancer

Vitamin C in Health: Scientific focus on its anti-cancer efficacy

M. W. Roomi, N Shanker, A Niedzwiecki, M Rath

Journal of Cellular Medicine and Natural Health, June 2016

 

Abstract:

Vitamin C, also known as L-ascorbic acid, is an undisputable essential vitamin for human health with antioxidant and anti-cancer properties among others. It is a cofactor for a number of metabolic enzymes and has enormous health benefits. Extensive epidemiological, in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies consistently and strongly suggest the benefits of Vitamin C use in cancer treatment. Epidemiological studies have shown that people consuming a diet rich in Vitamin C are less likely to develop cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that vitamin C kills cancer cells while simultaneously supporting normal cells and tissues. Clinical data indicates that intravenous administration of vitamin C is much more effective in achieving higher plasma levels, compared to oral administration, making the former the preferred means of administering Vitamin C to achieve sustainable therapeutic effect in cancer treatment. There are a wide variety of mechanisms by which vitamin C kills cancer cells and prevents their spread which include its roles as an anti-oxidant, an inhibitor of metalloproteinases and a supporter of collagen formation and tissue architecture. The therapeutic effect of Vitamin C is accompanied by the lack of cytotoxicity induced by conventional chemotherapy making it the most desirable anti-cancer therapy and one of the safest substances available to physicians. It has been observed through several studies that the anti-carcinogenic characteristics of Vitamin C are further enhanced in combination with other micronutrients such as lysine, arginine, proline and green tea extract. The synergistic effect of these nutrient mixtures can thus be considered in preventive and therapeutic aspects of cancer.

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Comparison of the efficacy of several nutritional supplements on cancer and normal cells growth

M. Chatterjee, V. Ivanov, A. Niedzwiecki, M. Rath

Journal of Cellular Medicine and Natural Health, Sept 2017

 

The majority of scientific and epidemiological evidence supports the beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation on various aspects of health. However, there have also been reports that some dietary supplements and vitamins can promote the growth of cancer. Given that the popularity and use of nutritional supplements is growing, it is important to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy of commercially available nutritional supplements.

Nutritional products on the market vary. Many contain single nutrients, while others contain combinations of vitamins, minerals, plant extracts and other nutritional components. The efficacy of such products will differ, but it is rarely, if at all, explained by manufacturers. Usually the selection of specific ingredients is based on published research conducted on individual vitamin, mineral or other nutritional components, however the biological outcome of the combination may depend on the synergistic or antagonistic interactions of its ingredients, the source of its raw materials, and the dose. Manufacturers of nutritional supplements typically do not invest in scientific micronutrient research, mostly taking care of the technological aspect of the formulations.

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Scientific evaluation of dietary factors in cancer

M.W. Roomi, A. Niedzwiecki, Ph.D., M. Rath, M.D.

Dr. Rath Research Institute,  1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050

J Nutri Med Diet Care 2018, 4:029

Abstract: 

Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that a proper diet and a healthy life style can decrease the risk of cancer by up to 70%. The cancers most closely related to nutrition are breast and endometrial cancers in women and prostate and gastrointestinal cancers in men.
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Induction of Apoptosis in Human Lung Cancer Cells (A-549) by a Novel Nutrient Mixture via Upregulation of Caspase Enzymes

M.W. Roomi, Ph.D., Ahmed T, A. Niedzwiecki, Ph.D., M. Rath, M.D.

Dr. Rath Research Institute,  1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050

Austin J Lung Cancer Res. 2018; 3(1): 1013 – 1016

Abstract: 

Lung cancer is the leading cause of death in western world, and the incidence continues to increase. Lung cancer is frequently diagnosed when it is extensively metastasized and has a dismal prognosis. Chemotherapy being the mainstay of treatment has not been able to increase quality of life or survival of patients. A novel nutrient mixture containing green tea extract, ascorbic acid, lysine, and proline exhibited anti-cancer effects in various cancers. In our earlier studies, the nutrient mixture considerably reduced the tumor weight and tumor burden in athymic mice using A-549 lung cancer cells.
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Peptide vaccines directed against human Metalloproteinases (MMPs) with anti-tumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo

M.W. Roomi, Ph.D., A. Niedzwiecki, Ph.D., M. Rath, M.D.

Dr. Rath Research Institute,  1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050

Journal of Cellular Medicine and Natural Health

Abstract: 

Despite sporadic progress, cancer has thus far eluded preventive and therapeutic approaches that can lead to an effective control of this global epidemic. The single most important reason for this failure is the fact that no effective intervention became available to impede the pathological pathways common to all types of cancer. In our study, we targeted metalloproteinases (MMPS), endopeptidases that are involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix (ECM). Among them, MMP-2 and MMP-9 are critically involved in all stages of cancer development including tumor growth, invasion and metastasis.

Our goal was to develop an anti-cancer vaccine by inhibiting these specific enzymes. We selected three oligopeptides from human MMP-9 and one from human MMP-2. We demonstrated the efficacy of these oligopeptides in generating immune response in mice. The  in vitro tests showed that anti-MMPs sera were effective in curbing invasion of HeLA cells through the extracellular matrix system (Matrigel).

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