Breast Cancer

Vitamin D enhances anticancer effects of EGCG and a specific micronutrient combination in breast cancer cells

V. Ivanov, S. Ivanova, A. Niedzwiecki, M. Rath

Journal of Cellular Medicine and Natural Health, June 2019

 

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide with over 508,000 deaths due to breast cancer in 2011. Current breast cancer therapies include localized surgery and radiation, as well as systemic treatments such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy.2 Although newer pharmaceutical options, such as targeted therapy and immunotherapy are being developed, the effective control of breast cancer is still out of reach. The use of natural components in cancer therapy has historically been a part of folk medicine, but recent research advancements in biologically active natural ingredients have established a solid scientific base for developing non-toxic and effective cancer approaches. Studies at the Dr Rath Research Institute documented that a combination of natural components, including vitamin C, polyphenols from green tea, the essential amino acids lysine, proline and arginine, N-acetyl cysteine and others, can affect key mechanisms involved in cancer. Several in vivo and in vitro studies confirmed the efficacy of this nutrient composition in inhibiting cancer cell growth, tissue invasion and metastasis, inducing natural cell death (apoptosis), and curtailing neo-vascularization of tumors in over 55 human cancer cell lines.

An increasing number of studies indicate the anticancer potential of vitamin D in triggering cancer cell cycle arrest, stimulation of apoptosis and inhibition of invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. It has been shown that vitamin D can interact with estrogen receptors and have positive effects in controlling estrogen-dependent breast cancer, however, specific cellular mechanisms involved are still not sufficiently understood. Also, epidemiological findings show an inverse association of circulating vitamin D levels with breast cancer.

Read more ...

Chemotherapy docetaxel-derived tumor debris promotes growth of 4T1 breast cancer tumors in female nude mice by multiple mechanisms

M. W. Roomi, A. Niedzwiecki, M. Rath

Journal of Cellular Medicine and Natural Health, July 2019

 

Abstract:

Chemotherapy and radiation are basic cancer therapies aimed at reducing tumor burden. These toxic agents destroy both malignant and normal cells thereby increasing the population of dying cells and/or tumor debris and causing other changes in the tumor microenvironment. These dead cells can act as a source of stimulants on surviving tumor cells leading to recurrence of tumors, thereby reducing survival rates. We investigated the effects of docetaxel-induced debris of 4T1 cells—a murine breast cancer line—on breast tumor growth in female mice. Female athymic mice were divided into three groups.

Read more ...

Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by a novel nutrient mixture of inoculation of mouse mammary 4T1 carcinoma in kidney of female Balb/c mice

M.W. Roomi, Ph.D., B. Bhanap M.D., A. Niedzwiecki, Ph.D. and M. Rath, M.D.

Dr. Rath Research Institute, Santa Clara, California, USA
Journal of Cellular Medicine and Natural Health, June 2018

 

Abstract:

Breast cancer is the most prevalent and commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide. Though it is treatable in early stages, there is no effective treatment available once it metastasizes. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) incidence is also on the rise and most of the patients present with metastatic cancer at the time of diagnosis. RCC is frequently presented with lung metastases that are poorly responsive to the conventional treatment of chemotherapy, and hormone and radiation therapy.

Read more ...

Lipoprotein(A) And Vitamin C Impair Development Of Breast Cancer Tumors In Lp(A)+; Gulo-/- Mice

John Cha*, M. Waheed Roomi*, Tatiana Kalinovsky, Aleksandra Niedzwiecki, Matthias Rath

*Contributed equally

Dr. Rath Research Institute, Santa Clara, California, USA
International Journal of Oncology    2016, 49(3), 895-902

 

Abstract:
Cancer progression is characterized by loss of extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity, which is a precondition for tumor growth and metastasis. In order to elucidate the precise mechanisms of ECM degradation in cancer we used a genetically modified mouse mimicking two distinct human metabolic features associated with cancerogenesis - the lack of endogenous vitamin C synthesis and the production of human Lp(a).  Female Lp(a)+;Gulo(-/-) and control wild type Balb/c mice without these two metabolic features were orthotopically inoculated with 4T1 breast cancer cells (5x105).

Read more ...

In vivo and in vitro effects of a nutrient mixture on breast 4T1 cancer progression

M.W. Roomi, T. Kalinovsky, N.M. Roomi, J. Cha, M. Rath, A. Niedzwiecki
Dr. Rath Research Institute, 1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050
International Journal of Oncology 2014, DOI: 10.3892/ijo.2014.2379

Abstract: 
Long-term survival of patients with breast cancer remains poor, due to metastasis and recurrence. We investigated the effect of a novel nutrient mixture (NM) containing ascorbic acid, lysine, proline, and green tea extract in vivo and in vitro on murine 4T1 breast cancer, a representative model for metastatic breast cancer. After one week of isolation, 5-6 week old female Balb/C mice were inoculated with 5x105 4T1 cells into the mammary pad and randomly divided into two groups; the Control group was fed a regular diet and the NM group a regular diet supplemented with 0.5% NM. After four weeks, the mice were sacrificed and their tumors, lungs, livers, kidneys, hearts and spleens were excised and processed for histology.

Read more ...